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Author Topic: Risks/Complications Of LL  (Read 79039 times)

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alps

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2014, 01:11:04 PM »

mehh if its amputation, Just end your own life fast easy. Not alot lost. But if you gain that new height. life begins. 50-50. Only the worthy survive
how do you suggest we end our own lives?
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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #32 on: December 07, 2014, 01:14:54 PM »

Very good comment. There's a clear bias in the forums not to show the complications. I have been attacked several times for writing about what i have seen at a very popular doctor. Nobody gets attacked for writing nice things. Even patients with diaries try to hide negative things (they are still under treatment , how could they dare openly criticise their doctors? ) . They rather stop writing or simply don't tell the truth.
I personally believe if i went to India my experience wouldn't have been worse than what has happened to me in Germany.

What happened to you?
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goodlucktomylegs

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2014, 01:58:52 PM »

Very good comment. There's a clear bias in the forums not to show the complications. I have been attacked several times for writing about what i have seen at a very popular doctor. Nobody gets attacked for writing nice things. Even patients with diaries try to hide negative things (they are still under treatment , how could they dare openly criticise their doctors? ) . They rather stop writing or simply don't tell the truth.
I personally believe if i went to India my experience wouldn't have been worse than what has happened to me in Germany.
I'm very sorry to  hear that
Get well soon
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TRS

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2014, 02:35:20 PM »

Very good comment. There's a clear bias in the forums not to show the complications. I have been attacked several times for writing about what i have seen at a very popular doctor. Nobody gets attacked for writing nice things. Even patients with diaries try to hide negative things (they are still under treatment , how could they dare openly criticise their doctors? ) . They rather stop writing or simply don't tell the truth.
I personally believe if i went to India my experience wouldn't have been worse than what has happened to me in Germany.
Unfortunately many people do dismiss things they don't want to hear. I'm really sorry for what you have gone through and I hope you do recover soon.

Questions rising shorty,
1. Why will non-union lead to amputation? Worst case let it stay unconsolidated, walk with crutches all your life.
Not all non-unions will lead to amputation. These days many cases are resolved with proper Ilizarov techniques, stem cells and growth factors but for some people non-union can last for many years or even life time and face complications such as fractures and infections. So they opt for amputation. Here is a study on non-unions http://actaorthopaedica.be/acta/download/2000-3/laursen-lass.pdf. There is one patient who requested amputation because he suffered from non-union, complications, disability and severe pain for 15 years.

2. Are there sudden "signs" of these dangers: nerve damage and compartment syndrome? So that you can stop lengthening in a timely fashion? It's not like you go to bed doing 1mm and the next morning it's over, right?
Yes, there are sudden signs of compartment syndrome and embolism
Here are some notes I prepared before my surgery and stored in my laptop for reference. You can call me crazy lol.
Compartment Syndrome
http://www.medicinenet.com/compartment_syndrome/article.htm
Signs:
Bleeding causes compartment pressure to rise and diminishes blood supply to nerves and muscles leading to:
-Pain exceeding the expectation of trauma
-Paresthesia (change in sensation) e.g tingling, tickling, prickling or burning of skin, pins and needles
-Paralysis of limb
-Tightness
-Bruising
-Swelling
Risks:
-Occurs hours or days after trauma
-Trauma include surgery, muscle, vascular damage
-Person with a history of anticoagulants
-Dressing, casts, splints constricting affected parts
-Permanent nerve and muscle damage mostly occur if patient is unconscious or heavily sedated, failing to report pain. Can occur 12-24 hours after compression
Treatment:
-Fasciotomy (making long incision on skin and fascia to release pressure)
-Removing cast, splints and dressing
Prevention:
-Early diagnosis and treatment should prevent complications
-People with cast should report pain under cast due to swelling, despite taking pain medications
Fat Embolism
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2700578/
Signs:
-Occurs 24-72 hours after surgery/trauma (maximum at 48 hours)
-Tachypnea (rapid breathing)
-Dyspnea (shortness of breath)
-Cyanosis (blue/purple discolouration of skin) in head, neck, thorax, sub conjunctiva, underarm
-Hypoxia (oxygen deprivation in body or region of body) Maybe detected hours before respiratory problems
-Cerebral problems e.g. confusion, drowsiness, rigidity, convulsions(rapid muscle contraction and relaxation) 
-Tachycardia (rapid resting heart rate)
-Jaundice
Risks:
-Trauma of pelvis and long bones
-Overzealous nailing of the medullary canal
-Reaming the medullary canal
-Increased velocity of reaming
-Increase in gap between nail and cortical bone
Treatment:
-Mechanical ventilation to maintain arterial oxygenation
-Albumin with electrolyte solution to restore blood volume and bind to the fatty acids to decrease lung injury
Prevention:
-The use of plates and external frame or smaller diameter nails decreases FES by reducing injury instead of nailing and reaming the medullary canal
-Using a pulse oximeter to monitor 02 saturation in blood therefore early desaturation will allow early oxygenation treatment to decrease hypoxic and systemic damage
-Preoperative use of methylprednisolone may prevent FES
Pulmonary Embolism
Cause
Blockage of lung artery from a blood clot developed in the deep leg veins.
Signs:
-Sudden shortness of breath
-Sharp chest pain and worse especially after cough or deep breath
-Pink foamy mucous cough/bloody cough
-Sweat a lot
-Anxiety
-Light headedness/faint
-Fast heart rate/breathing rate/irregular heart beat
-Heart palpitation
-Signs of shock
Risks:
- Surgery involving both legs/breaking bones where arteries/veins are affected
-Inherited risk of developing clots
-Slowed blood flow from long term bed rests after surgery, sitting for a long time, leg paralysis
-Abnormal blood clotting from blood vessel injury
-Not taking anticoagulents
Treatment:
-Anticoagulants (3 months after embolism or through life if risk remains high)
Hospital use of IV or shots/Home use via tablets
Slow down clot development and prevent clots getting bigger. But do not break up or dissolve existing blood clots
-Thrombolytics for extreme life threatening situations
All thrombolytics are capable of causing serious bleeding and capable of causing stroke and death.
-Embolectomy via surgery or catheter into the blood vessel
For patients with life threatening clots and cannot wait for medicine to work or for other failed treatments. Increases chance of developing more clots.
-Vena cava insertion into large central abdominal vein after failed anticoagulant treatment or bleeding risks fem anticoagulants. Or if a patient has an increase risk of death or restricted lifestyle for a recurrent emboli. Can break or be blocked with blood clots.
Prevention:
-Daily use of anticoagulants stops formation of new blood clots and prevents further growth of existing clots.
-Movement after surgery
-Compression stockings

For nerve damage, signs will be tingling, severe pain, loss/abnormal sensation, paralysis and loss of motor control.

3. You seem to have a tone of someone prepared for this kind of stuff? Could you have really lived through if you faced a leg amputation? I don't understand how someone who feels so unhappy being short and considers a ridiculously crazy procedure can accept such an adverse outcome. No offense, just curious.
Good question.
Yes I did prepare myself for the worst and I feel that in order to be ideal candidate for LL, people must consider whether they will be able to cope with the worst case scenario of amputation and whether others will cope in an unfortunate event of death. You may laugh at me but I made a will before I left for SA just to prepare for the worse. Personally, if I did lose my limbs then I would try and find solace knowing that I did try my best to fight the constant heightism I suffered for the past 20 years. I would then try and find happiness while being an amputee and not go straight into taking my own life.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 02:55:36 PM by TheRisingShorty »
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alps

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2014, 05:22:49 PM »

Yes, there are sudden signs of compartment syndrome and embolism
I went through those links, but some aspects of limb lengthening are not particularly addressed.
What I think now is that the "risky" part is during the surgery. After the surgery once you start lengthening, the worst outcomes can be poor recovery and non-union. I was wondering if everyday is a dread whilst lengthening, because nerve damage and contractures can happen even while lengthening as you indicated.

Quote
Good question.
Yes I did prepare myself for the worst and I feel that in order to be ideal candidate for LL, people must consider whether they will be able to cope with the worst case scenario of amputation and whether others will cope in an unfortunate event of death. You may laugh at me but I made a will before I left for SA just to prepare for the worse. Personally, if I did lose my limbs then I would try and find solace knowing that I did try my best to fight the constant heightism I suffered for the past 20 years. I would then try and find happiness while being an amputee and not go straight into taking my own life.

Is there a way to tell the doctor to euthanize you if things one of the worst outcomes happen and you have no control after that.

Do you think someone who has no motivation to live if the worst case of amputation happens is a good LL candidate? if not, why not?
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TRS

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #36 on: December 07, 2014, 06:29:19 PM »

I went through those links, but some aspects of limb lengthening are not particularly addressed.
Some of the links only describe and address the condition itself. They are from general medical websites not specialising in LL but provide very helpful information on conditions that can manifest after LL surgery.
What I think now is that the "risky" part is during the surgery. After the surgery once you start lengthening, the worst outcomes can be poor recovery and non-union. I was wondering if everyday is a dread whilst lengthening, because nerve damage and contractures can happen even while lengthening as you indicated.
Yes the surgery itself is very risky and it is of vital importance to go to a experienced surgeon who specialises in LL. I'd consider the entire LL phase to be risky because the latency period after surgery is when chances of compartment syndrome,embolism and deep infection to be at its peak. The risk of embolism can also present during distraction and that is why some surgeons continue anticoagulant treatment with their patients.
You're right about the risk of nerve damage, contractures, delayed/non-union and poor recovery during distraction phase. Don't forget the risk of device malfunction. And then the chance of refracture and poor recovery during consolidation.
Is there a way to tell the doctor to euthanize you if things one of the worst outcomes happen and you have no control after that.
It depends where you reside. It's illegal where I live but maybe possible in your country.
Do you think someone who has no motivation to live if the worst case of amputation happens is a good LL candidate? if not, why not?
This is a very difficult question to answer to be honest since the views will be highly subjective. If height is the major cause of suffering and preventing one from living a normal life then that particular person would be a good candidate for LL, regardless whether he has the motivation to live after the worst case of amputation. Instead people should ask themselves whether they have the motivation to live at their current height? Remember that chances of amputation is almost zero with a good surgeon.
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alps

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #37 on: December 07, 2014, 08:20:43 PM »

How was your mentality whilst lengthening?
Were you scared all the time about such possibilities like you probably were scared just before surgery?
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TRS

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #38 on: December 07, 2014, 09:06:51 PM »

How was your mentality whilst lengthening?
Were you scared all the time about such possibilities like you probably were scared just before surgery?
Pre-op nerves was the worst. The week before LL was very emotional and my flight to SA was possibly the worst flight ever because of the constant thought of whether I would make it through LL. After my consultation with Dr.B I looked forward to my surgery and just wanted to get over with it. I was really excited when they took me to the operation theatre the next day. I felt very euphoric and relieved right after surgery. During lengthening I was constantly occupied with the fear of nail failure and failing to reach my target. Other complications like nerve damage was the least of my concern because I paid very close attention to how my legs responded during lengthening. Fortunately I did not have any complications like nerve pain and contractures. The social isolation and the monotonous days during lengthening did have a toll on me but I kept my self busy with physio, cooking, reading study materials, TV, music etc..
« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 10:40:47 PM by TheRisingShorty »
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History101

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #39 on: January 12, 2015, 07:09:40 AM »

I wrote a response on this article regarding knee pain: http://www.limblengtheningforum.com/index.php?topic=1562.msg24774#new

But I thought this would be a good area to post it as well, and hopefully it will help people make better, more informed decisions regarding their limb lengthening journey and their fate:

1. Pain when kneeling on a hard surface, occasional discomfort when walking.   Nothing at all when standing still.
2. None, really.  I can still kneel.
3. 3-4 when kneeling on a hard surface, 1 occasionally when walking.

I get pain too when kneeling on hard surfaces and I never had anything inserted into my knees. I also feel discomfort when walking for long periods of time, as well my feet ache (like normal people do)...All of these "issues" were always there, even before my Femur lengthening.

I think most normal, healthy people, if they had to kneel or "walk on their knees" on a hard surface will get some type of pain or discomfort.

On a side note: I also receive discomfort when using my Elbows to crawl on a hard surface as well even though I never receive shoulder surgery.

That is why we cannot be so rash to form conclusions based on small sample sizes.

Hence, why, for example, in Japanese or Asian cultures where is kneeling is customary, people are aware of the discomfort of kneeling on hard surfaces and oftentimes use pillows, mats, or other cushions when kneeling to give comfort.

http://www.istockphoto.com/photo/japanese-couple-kneeling-on-a-tatami-mat-in-traditional-way-18936481

http://www.istockphoto.com/photo/japanese-couple-kneeling-on-a-tatami-mat-in-traditional-way-18936481

The most important thing is as you have no pain or discomfort when functioning in daily life such as standing or walking, then one could say that your knees are relatively healthy and is in line with the general population.

For example, I read many articles of people who never underwent LL but still get knee pain for a variety of other reasons such as being overweight, being inactive, sports injuries, arthritis, diseases, Old Age and more.

I also read and personally witnessed people who were involved in traumatic injuries which required Metal rods; many of them had little to no issues whereas others complained about pain while being mobile and functioning in daily life. Whether that pain is because of their accident trauma or because of the IM Nail insertion is debatable.

I work in the medical field and see many cases of people who had IM Nail inserted through their knees and they are functioning 100% fine, lead an active lifestyle, and can do everything they usually do.

Also, I have personally witnessed other people who have never done LL still get knee pains even though there was no insertion trauma. Generally, they can barely stand for long periods and walk with pain. Some of these people cannot function in day to day life without pain or disability.
They have other issues which has caused knee pains such as being overweight, weak or unbalanced leg muscles, being inactive, unhealthy lifestyle, arthritis, diseases, from Old Age, and more.
This is a far cry from the "Superman" MDOW who can function in everyday life, and in his words,"feels stronger after my limb lengthening then before" and could lift more after his Limb lengthening then before it.

Finally, I have had the fortune to communicate with old patients who underwent Limb Lengthening with Rod Insertion (LON And LATN) and they have told me they experienced nothing negative longterm and fully recovered...even the Indian Doctor ones like sarin. Look at people like Smallguy, Captain America, or Calic.

So essentially saying, medical and biological responses are incredibly complex with many variables from a person's history, their bodies ability to heal, or many other countless variables so we cannot jump into rash final conclusions based on a very small sample size of a few active forum members.

Also, remember that the proper insertion of IM Nall for healthy patients who undergo Limb Lengthening in controlled way is different from the patients who experienced trauma, accidents or injuries and require emergency IM Nail insertion on top of their injuries and other variables.

Remember, correlation does not equal causation.
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Moubgf

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #40 on: January 12, 2015, 02:34:06 PM »

I wrote a response on this article regarding knee pain: http://www.limblengtheningforum.com/index.php?topic=1562.msg24774#new

But I thought this would be a good area to post it as well, and hopefully it will help people make better, more informed decisions regarding their limb lengthening journey and their fate:

I get pain too when kneeling on hard surfaces and I never had anything inserted into my knees. I also feel discomfort when walking for long periods of time, as well my feet ache (like normal people do)...All of these "issues" were always there, even before my Femur lengthening.

I think most normal, healthy people, if they had to kneel or "walk on their knees" on a hard surface will get some type of pain or discomfort.

On a side note: I also receive discomfort when using my Elbows to crawl on a hard surface as well even though I never receive shoulder surgery.

That is why we cannot be so rash to form conclusions based on small sample sizes.

Hence, why, for example, in Japanese or Asian cultures where is kneeling is customary, people are aware of the discomfort of kneeling on hard surfaces and oftentimes use pillows, mats, or other cushions when kneeling to give comfort.

http://www.istockphoto.com/photo/japanese-couple-kneeling-on-a-tatami-mat-in-traditional-way-18936481

http://www.istockphoto.com/photo/japanese-couple-kneeling-on-a-tatami-mat-in-traditional-way-18936481

The most important thing is as you have no pain or discomfort when functioning in daily life such as standing or walking, then one could say that your knees are relatively healthy and is in line with the general population.

For example, I read many articles of people who never underwent LL but still get knee pain for a variety of other reasons such as being overweight, being inactive, sports injuries, arthritis, diseases, Old Age and more.

I also read and personally witnessed people who were involved in traumatic injuries which required Metal rods; many of them had little to no issues whereas others complained about pain while being mobile and functioning in daily life. Whether that pain is because of their accident trauma or because of the IM Nail insertion is debatable.

I work in the medical field and see many cases of people who had IM Nail inserted through their knees and they are functioning 100% fine, lead an active lifestyle, and can do everything they usually do.

Also, I have personally witnessed other people who have never done LL still get knee pains even though there was no insertion trauma. Generally, they can barely stand for long periods and walk with pain. Some of these people cannot function in day to day life without pain or disability.
They have other issues which has caused knee pains such as being overweight, weak or unbalanced leg muscles, being inactive, unhealthy lifestyle, arthritis, diseases, from Old Age, and more.
This is a far cry from the "Superman" MDOW who can function in everyday life, and in his words,"feels stronger after my limb lengthening then before" and could lift more after his Limb lengthening then before it.

Finally, I have had the fortune to communicate with old patients who underwent Limb Lengthening with Rod Insertion (LON And LATN) and they have told me they experienced nothing negative longterm and fully recovered...even the Indian Doctor ones like sarin. Look at people like Smallguy, Captain America, or Calic.

So essentially saying, medical and biological responses are incredibly complex with many variables from a person's history, their bodies ability to heal, or many other countless variables so we cannot jump into rash final conclusions based on a very small sample size of a few active forum members.

Also, remember that the proper insertion of IM Nall for healthy patients who undergo Limb Lengthening in controlled way is different from the patients who experienced trauma, accidents or injuries and require emergency IM Nail insertion on top of their injuries and other variables.

Remember, correlation does not equal causation.


why is he on the floor crawling in the first place? have not done it before the surgery and sure as hell wont become sports magasine #1 loverboy after.

Aslong as i can walk down to the supermarket with my girlfriend and take a ice cream. Or go to a festival and watch some shows i am all good.
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medcare

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #41 on: January 20, 2015, 03:50:50 PM »

Think twice about this for cosmetic purposes. I've been witness of disastrous outcomes in otherwise perfectly healthy patients. This is not correct.
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ReadRothbard

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #42 on: January 20, 2015, 03:57:30 PM »

Such as what?
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“If you're afraid - don't do it, - if you're doing it - don't be afraid!” ― Genghis Khan

Height: 170 cm(66.9") Sitting Height: 95 cm (37.5") Goal: 183-185 cm (6'0-6'1)

Physics major, male stripper, powerlifter,

KrP1

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #43 on: January 20, 2015, 04:20:26 PM »

Think twice about this for cosmetic purposes. I've been witness of disastrous outcomes in otherwise perfectly healthy patients. This is not correct.

i didnt read what you said yet, please repeat
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ReadRothbard

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #44 on: February 10, 2015, 07:07:46 PM »

Medcare, you’re usually very rude, but in this thread you’re telling the truth. Sometimes LL leads to disastrous outcomes, and sometimes these disasters are unavoidable, even if you’re operated by the best surgeons in the world. Fat embolism, for example, isn’t a theoretical complication, but a very real risk which is usually silenced in the forum and however happens. And there are patients from the best surgeons in the world who die from it. I’ve been told this by a very reliable source from a medical point of view. 
Can we do anything to avoid these risks? Sometimes it's imposible to avoid these disastrous outcomes, but you can minimize complications by choosing a good doctor, who stays in the safe zone and respects the protocols. It’s better not doing more than one segment at once and even avoiding CLL if possible. Risks are high and real out there.

Do you happen to have any data on how often fat embolism happens?
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“If you're afraid - don't do it, - if you're doing it - don't be afraid!” ― Genghis Khan

Height: 170 cm(66.9") Sitting Height: 95 cm (37.5") Goal: 183-185 cm (6'0-6'1)

Physics major, male stripper, powerlifter,

KiloKAHN

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #45 on: February 10, 2015, 07:53:09 PM »

Only things about embolism death I found so far:

[Fat embolism during limb lengthening with a centromedullary nail: three cases].
Blondel B1, Violas P, Launay F, Sales de Gauzy J, Kohler R, Jouve JL, Bollini G.

Several methods are available for progressive limb lengthening, including centromedullary nailing, external fixation, or a combination. Each technique has its own advantages and drawbacks. In trauma victims, use of centromedullary nailing is associated with potentially fatal fat embolism. This fatal outcome might also occur during limb lengthening, particularly in bilateral procedures. To our knowledge, fat embolism has not been reported with the use of centromedullary nail for limb lengthening. This was a multicentric study of three cases of fat embolism, including one fatal outcome. In all, 36 centromedullary lengthening nails were inserted in the three centers before these acute episodes. The first two cases occurred during single-phase bilateral procedures, the third during unilateral lengthening.

Fat embolism could result from several factors, as reported in the literature. While the bilateral nature of the procedure has been incriminated, the observation of an embolism during a unilateral procedure suggests other factors may be involved. Considerable increase in endomedullary pressure during reaming and insertion of the nail has been demonstrated. At the same time, there is the question as to whether the reduction of the diminution of medullary pressure by corticotomy would be an efficient way of reducing the risk of fat embolism. Based on the analysis of our three cases, we suggest that the best way to avoid fat embolism might be to drill several holes within the area of the osteotomy before reaming, in order to reduce endomedullary pressure. This can be achieved via a short skin incision, sparing the periosteum before low energy osteotomy. Since applying this protocol, the three centers have implanted 17 lengthening nails, without a single case of fat embolism.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18774027

Strategy in the surgical treatment of achondroplasia: techniques applied in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology Hospital of Lecco
M.A. Catagni, F. Guerreschi, L. Lovisetti

Between 1982 and 2007, 128 patients with achondroplasia were treated in the Lecco Hospital. 100 of these were treated with sequential bilateral limb lengthening and seven with crossed lengthening. The average tibial lengthening was 14.1 centimeters (range: 6 to 19 cm). The average femoral lengthening was 9.8 centimeters (range: 8 to 12 cm), and the average humeral lengthening 8.3 centimeters (range: 8 to 12 cm).

...

The complications were classified as minor, moderate, and severe. Minor complications were those which required only modification of the apparatus during treatment. Twenty-three percent of the lengthenings required some modification of the device during treatment. Moderate complications were those which required additional procedures during lengthening. Forty-two percent of patients fell into this category. Finally, severe complications were those which required another surgery following treatment or had lasting sequelae of the treatment. Twenty-one percent of patients fell into this category. The most common complication was equinus contractures of the ankle which required treatment by tendoachilles lengthening. Two pulmonary emboli were sustained following percutaneous tendo-achilles lengthening. One patient died as a result of this complication.


http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10261-009-0032-9
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Surgery performed by Dr Mangal Parihar at Mangal Anand Center for Limb Lengthening & Reconstruction. http://www.limblengtheningforum.com/index.php?topic=634.0
Pre-surgery height:  164 cm (Surgery on 6/25/2014)
Post-surgery height: 170 cm (Frames removed 6/29/2015)

Tyler_Durden

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #46 on: March 05, 2015, 12:08:21 AM »

^^ Actually there are ways you can prevent Fat embolism .
This is what Dr Dror Paley have wrote about it :
http://www.screencast.com/t/aRmHCK8m

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abo

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2015, 03:06:17 PM »

So you wont be able doing sports after doing this?!
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182-183 on the morning! 181cm the whole day! the night 180,5/180,8cm!

Samuimw

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #48 on: April 25, 2015, 11:25:16 AM »

This made me so scared.
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Samuimw

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #49 on: April 25, 2015, 03:29:57 PM »

Does anyone know when fat embolism occurs? Can it happen all the way through the LL? Or only a few hours after the surgery?
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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #50 on: May 05, 2015, 04:52:00 PM »

Interesting answer, mm. I like this kind of answers more than your other posts. In my humble opinion you're usually too credulous and naive. Too young perhaps? You should be more critical.
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YellowSpike

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #51 on: May 05, 2015, 04:56:39 PM »

Interesting answer, mm. I like this kind of answers more than your other posts. In my humble opinion you're usually too credulous and naive. Too young perhaps? You should be more critical.

Oh snap! Dems are fightin' words!  :o
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heightangel

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #52 on: May 05, 2015, 05:09:02 PM »

Oh snap! Dems are fightin' words!  :o

No. I'm just being friendly. I like this post.
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YellowSpike

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #53 on: May 05, 2015, 06:06:33 PM »

No. I'm just being friendly. I like this post.

What you said seemed like a backhanded compliment. You called MM naive lol. But I was only joking...I'll grab some popcorn and stay out of it ;)
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Tylerdurden389

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #54 on: June 16, 2015, 02:44:27 PM »

The opening post to this thread is great, as well as the list of any and all complication that may/will occur during treatment post surgery. It's definitely given me some perspective about LL. I had never honestly considered doing it while I'm still poor (maybe someday I'll be in the working class status if things at my job go well, lol). But honestly, I think if were to ever hit the lottery, I'd get the surgery, only get 5 cm on both bones (for a total of almost 4 inches) and attempt to make myself go from 5-2 (158 cm) to 5-6 (167). And if complications arose that prevented me from being athletic anymore, or worse yet, confined to a wheelchair, I think having my millions of $$$ would make up for it.

Sorry if my post is redundant to the topic but just thought I'd share my tfeelings on this with like-minded individuals :)
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drewicz

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #55 on: July 12, 2015, 06:54:35 PM »

These are complications of all surgery.
I had once a surgery to cut lump on my arm bone and i must signed a statement that it is possibility that i can't move my hands after that.

Did anyone know someone who all paralyzed or have nerve damage after LL?
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Infinity

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #56 on: December 02, 2015, 12:08:51 AM »

It is not so far fetched that general patients are apprehensive about reporting complication when still lengthening under the care of the surgeon. More so if surgeon regularly visits the forum.

I have personally seen few complications with some renowned European surgeons where patients have lost function. Generally compartment syndrome and foot drop is a very real possibility when doing internal tibias.

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Madmax_01

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #57 on: December 17, 2015, 10:40:58 PM »

I could find information about complications from tibia lenghtening surgery on Wikipedia, which had references from Pubmed. I could not find the link but I remember something about 75% suffered from arthritis. Does anyone have information about long-term complications after INTERNAL FEMUR lenghtening? Any scientific data or studys to back up the infos which are presented in the forum.
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PatientZero

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #58 on: December 17, 2015, 10:59:11 PM »

Interesting answer, mm. I like this kind of answers more than your other posts. In my humble opinion you're usually too credulous and naive. Too young perhaps? You should be more critical.

That's a sh1tty humble opinion and you are 98% wrong. I have met the goddess herself in real life. Desperate is not the same as being naive or credulous.
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Real patient doing internal femur LL, not a pretender.

Alu

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #59 on: December 17, 2015, 11:22:31 PM »

I could find information about complications from tibia lenghtening surgery on Wikipedia, which had references from Pubmed. I could not find the link but I remember something about 75% suffered from arthritis. Does anyone have information about long-term complications after INTERNAL FEMUR lenghtening? Any scientific data or studys to back up the infos which are presented in the forum.

Internal Femurs aren't relatively old or new, so I doubt there are long term studies into the after effect (I certainly couldn't really find anything). But, I would infer that a huge factor into what might cause Arthritis in relation to LL through the Femurs would be how much one lengthens and how the rods are inserted. I know for a fact Paley likes to insert his nails through the back, and not through the knees.
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Alu

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #60 on: December 17, 2015, 11:29:36 PM »

Also the best/closest things to studies we have are these abstract conference book for an event that occurred about a month ago in which orthopedist congregated and talked about their own experiences.
http://illrsmiami2015.com/abstract-book/

As far as the details go it's very much sparse and vague as it can possibly be; to my knowledge none of the lectures were recorded or are available to the general public. What is interesting about this is that includes the like of Dong-Lee, Paley, and Guichet talking about their results with Cosmetic Limb Lengthening.
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Madmax_01

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Re: Risks/Complications Of LL
« Reply #61 on: December 18, 2015, 01:19:26 AM »

Internal Femurs aren't relatively old or new, so I doubt there are long term studies into the after effect (I certainly couldn't really find anything). But, I would infer that a huge factor into what might cause Arthritis in relation to LL through the Femurs would be how much one lengthens and how the rods are inserted. I know for a fact Paley likes to insert his nails through the back, and not through the knees.

Do you have any idea what might be the red line here? Speaking about the insertion of the nail. Do you know if Dr Guichet uses the same technique?

I am asking myself these questions because tibia lenghtening seems to have a lot of correlation when it comes to knee problems. I was wondering if the same applies to femur lenghtening.

Also the best/closest things to studies we have are these abstract conference book for an event that occurred about a month ago in which orthopedist congregated and talked about their own experiences.
http://illrsmiami2015.com/abstract-book/

As far as the details go it's very much sparse and vague as it can possibly be; to my knowledge none of the lectures were recorded or are available to the general public. What is interesting about this is that includes the like of Dong-Lee, Paley, and Guichet talking about their results with Cosmetic Limb Lengthening.

That looks like a great ressource. Thank you! I wish we could find out more about the lectures.
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